News and Announcements

Post Author Picture

ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT INJURIES

Posted by Mike McMahon at Oct 22, 2001 5:00PM PDT ( 0 Comments )
Cross, M.J. (1998). Anterior cruciate ligament injuries: treatment and rehabilitation. In: Encyclopedia of Sports Medicine and Science, T.D.Fahey (Editor).
Post Author Picture

HOW TO HELP YOUR DAUGHTER AND HER TEAM

Posted by Paul Loucks at Oct 21, 2001 5:00PM PDT ( 0 Comments )

(Basketball Coaching - In Search of Excellence)
           
1. Please don't shout advice to your player during the game. Shout encouragement? You bet. A steady stream of technique suggestions, though, has no value. Your insightful tips may conflict with my instruction.

2. Please don't harass the refs. Parents that loudly harass the referee are embarrassing to the player and the team. When a parent makes a spectacle of himself at a game, the player is embarrassed. If the ref is being reamed by a parent for a bad call (by definition, a bad call is any decision made against the parent's child), what does the player learn? He learns that the mistake wasn't his fault. It was the result of poor officiating. This is a bad habit to get into.

Don't encourage your child to place the blame for their failures upon others. One of the benefits of playing sports is learning to accept responsibility instead of making excuses.

Sometimes a call is hard to take for whatever reason. Such times are tests of emotional control. If a player can learn to bite his lip and move on, a parent can learn to sit quietly for a moment and let the emotion pass. Learning to cope with disappointment is a valuable life skill.

3. Don't blame the coach for your child's problems or lack of playing time. Your child's struggles to succeed are your child's problems. Let him work them out without your interference. A player has every right to ask a coach what needs to be done to earn more playing time, for example. But a parent stepping in to demand playing time is another thing altogether.

4. Please don't talk bad about the coach in front of your child. The worst thing a parent can do is take pot shots at the coach, criticizing decisions, and complaining about his leadership. Support the coach and stand behind his decisions.

5. Please don't razz the other team's players. The other team's players should be considered off limits. Yelling at or deriding someone else's child is a shameful practice for an adult at a sporting event. Parents who intend to disrupt, distract or upset players exhibit the worst of poor sportsmanship.

As a parent, be involved in a positive way. Attend your child's games as often as you can. Cheer for all the kids on the team. Help with fund raising. Assist with logistics. If you're not sure how to help, ask the coach.

at Camp Echo Lake in Warrensburg New York Stephanie McCarty: Professional Basketball Player WNBA. First Team all-American, Purdue University, 1999 NCAA Champions, runner-up for National Player of the Year, NCAA Women's Final Four all-Tournament Team, former Indiana's Miss Basketball. Is a unique opportunity for girls aged 10 - 15 to play basketball at a superb facility and receive great coaching! The camp provides an overnight experience where the primary focus of the program is to develop skills and increase court awareness both on offense and defense.image
Aug. 6 - 11 for boys and girls ages 10 - 17 from 9 a.m. - noon. Call: 477-1004.
Post Author Picture

Individual Offensive Improvement Camp

Posted by Mike McMahon at Jul 23, 2001 5:00PM PDT ( 0 Comments )
Will be held at Junior College of Albany July 16 - 20 for 6th - 8th grade girls. Aug. 6 - 10 for high school girls perimeter Aug. 13 - 17 for high school boys and girls post players. Call: Jim Murray at 439-2007 or Ed Pierce at 767-2730.